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be very interesting. still ahead, a critical decision loom for the prop 8 in california. we'll have reaction from both sides and how fran is preparing for tomorrow's ruling. >>> also, lotto fans rejoice. the new option coming to california and what it could mean for the state budget. plus -- >> reporter: and speaking of that state budget, in tonight's reality check, we look at redevelopments and whether or not claims are true that city governments could be bilked by the state out of their own land. >>> good evening. i'm jeff ranieri in the weather center. we're tracking the storm as rain moves in across the bay. >>> for decades, redevelop many served as a tool for cities until the great recession hit and california's governor dissolved them to save money. some local governments say they're losing more than they ever bargained for. in only the's reality check, sam brock examines one city's claim that the state of california might rob its taxpayers of hundreds of millions in assets. >> good evening. this subject matter is all on display in a letter sent to santa clara taxpayers in whi
of this never ending conflict. the truth is that the california nurse's association is trying to protect the richest contract in its union and the richest contract, for that matter in the entire country. both sides acknowledge that, but the truth is also that hundreds of part-time nurses could end up with no health care at all if the proposal is pushed through. power, it's a relative term for the california nurses association. a total of seven strikes in just over a year has netted little progress and no deal on a union contract that expired in the middle of 2011. >> what we're asking for is nothing more than what we have. we're not asking for anything more than the contract that we have. >> but the contract the nurses have, which includes three hospitals in the east bay, is the richest in the country. by both sides' admission. >> they're very, very well compensated, and they should be. the bay area is expensive. they're the top of the heap. >> just how high up on that heap is up for debate. using the same w-2 forms, health officials say the average nurse pulls in $136,000 for a full-tim
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2